Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Ignition Coil Moisture Revisited

Parts of this article by John Shelor first appeared in the V8 Times, Volume 42, Number 3 and Number 4. John is a Mechanical Engineer and Journeymen Electrician with a passion for improving old Ford engines.


In the previous article

Antique Ford V8 Ignition Coils with Non-Metallic Cases
John explains how moisture becomes a problem in antique flathead Ford V-8 engine coils with non-metallic cases and the process he has developed to remove the moisture. This process significantly improves coil  output voltage resulting in the automobile's ability to better climb hills, go faster, and crank more easily after a short trip.


The original process described in the previous article was first developed in 2002. Since that time it has been significantly automated and improved for even better coil performance.


The moisture removal process was improved greatly in December 2005 by the use of an efficient two-stage vacuum pump capable of removing up to 99.9% of the moisture and other gasses contained in the vessel, and by fully automating the process.




The Updated Process


The coils are processed in a pot heated with heat lamps to about 130 to 135 degrees F. The vessel is alternatively evacuated to extreme negative pressure, and then filled with dry nitrogen. Each of the two-hour cycles consists of 75 minutes at high vacuum, and 45 minutes for nitrogen diffusion at atmospheric pressure.


Under extremely high vacuum, the boiling point of water is depressed to 32 degrees or less while the pot is at 130-135 degrees. Coils held at about 100 degrees above the boiling point of water readily give up the moisture. The pressure variations cause a breathing action that aids moisture removal from the innermost windings and insulation.




Moisture Removal Results


The combined performance of the latest three batches of coils, 59 total, utilizing the high-vacuum pump and an average of 118 - two-hour cycles produced the following:
  
The average starting voltage was 20,983.


The average finishing voltage was 29,280.


That is an average gain of 8,297 volts per coil or a 39.54% gain.




Recent Process Milestones


The first coil to improve from 0 to 32,000 volts in one pass.


The first coils ever (33 of the 59) to test 32,000 volts on the hot test with 55.93% pegging the meter.


The first measurable quantity of coil water collected at the approximate rate of 6 drops per coil and 10 drops per operating day.




Our Best Run to Date


Voltage Recovery/Moisture Removal 20 Coils



                    Final             Previous                              %
Coil          "Stressed"       "Stressed"      Voltage        Voltage
Number      Voltage          Voltage         Gained         Gained
 673            32,000             2,000          30,000          1500.0
 670            32,000             6,000          26,000            433.3
 677            27,500             6,000          21,500            358.3
 678            32,000             8,500          23,500            276.5
 680            28,000             7,500          20,500            273.3
F676           30,000           11,000          19,000            172.7
 652            31,000           12,500         18,500             148.0
F674           32,000           14,000         18,000             128.6
 681            32,000           14,000         18,000             128.6
 666            27,000           12,000         15,000             125.0
 667            31,000           15,000         16,000             106.7
F683           30,000           16,000         14,000               87.5
 687            30,000           17,500         12,500               73.5
F675           32,000           20,000         12,000               60.0
 669            31,000           20,000         11,000               55.0
F685           27,000           18,000           9,000               50.0
F690           32,000           22,000         10,000               45.5
 682            20,000           14,000           6,000               42.9
F688           17,000           12,000           5,000               41.7
  691           32,000           23,000           9,000               39.1     
Average     29,275            13,550         15,725              116.1%        




Pure Speculation


The coils finishing the treatment with 32,000 volt output may even contain less water than they were born with.


John Shelor
(540) 639-16333



3 comments:

  1. My question is, since the problem happens when moist conditions are present and seems to go away after some driving, would this indicate a faulty coil pack and not faulty spark plug/wires?

    ReplyDelete
  2. The coils finishing the treatment with 32,000 volt output may even contain less water than they were born with.

    ReplyDelete
  3. The coils finishing the treatment with 32,000 volt output may even contain less water than they were born with.

    ReplyDelete